Posted on

UK Mail Order Marijuana

Rate this post

DESCRIPTION

Cannabis in the United Kingdom is illegal for recreational use and is classified as a Class B drug. BUY MARIJUANA UK In 2004, cannabis was made a Class C drug with less severe penalties but it was moved back to Class B in 2009. Medical use of cannabis, when prescribed by a registered specialist doctor, was legalised in November 2018. BUY MARIJUANA UK

Cannabis is widely used as an illegal drug in the UK, while other strains lower in THC have been used industrially for over a thousand years for fibre, oil and seeds. Cannabis has been restricted as a drug in the United Kingdom since 1928, though its usage as a recreational drug was limited until the 1960s, when increasing popularity led to stricter 1971 classification.

Despite the fact that cannabis is still illegal in the UK, with limited availability for medical use, the United Kingdom is the world’s largest exporter of legal cannabis.

Industrial use

The Mary Rose needed tons of hemp.

The oldest evidence of cannabis in Britain was from some seeds found in a well in York seeds found at Micklegate were associated with a 10th-century Viking settlement Since it appears to have been mostly grown around the coastal areas it suggests the main reason for cultivating it was as a source of vegetable fibre which was stronger and more durable than stinging nettle or flax. This makes it ideal for making into cordage, ropes, fishing nets and canvas. BUY MARIJUANA UK

With hempen ropes being fundamental to the success of the English Navy, King Henry VIII in 1533 mandated that landowners grow allotments of hemp; Elizabeth I later increased those quotas, and the penalties for failing to meet them. As fibre became more available and the growing of hemp became more widespread, people began to find many other uses for the crop. It became a very important part of the British economy. Eventually, demand had expanded to the point that the demand for more fibre was part of the driving force to colonise new lands. Thanks to its hardiness and ease of cultivation, it became an ideal crop to grow in the new British colonies. Moreover, the naval ships built to protect the new colonies and those built to bring the hemp back, also increased demand, as every two years or so much of their two hundred tonnes of ropes and sail cloth had to be renewed.

Use as a drug

Cannabis gained new attention in the Western medical world at the introduction of Irish physician William Brooke O’Shaughnessy, who had studied the drug while working as a medical officer in Bengal with the East India Company, and brought a quantity of cannabis with him on his return to Britain in 1842.

Use of psychoactive cannabis was already prevalent in some of the new territories that Britain added to its empire, including South Asia and Southern Africa. Cannabis as a drug also spread slowly in other parts of the Empire; cannabis was introduced to Jamaica in the 1850s–1860s by indentured servants imported from India during British rule of both nations; many of the terms used in cannabis culture in Jamaica are based on Indian terms, including the term ganja.

Prohibition

Cannabis prohibition began earlier in Britain’s colonies than in Britain itself; attempts at criminalising cannabis in British India were made, and mooted, in 1838, 1871, and 1877.[11] In 1894 the British Indian Hemp Drugs Commission judged that “little injury” was caused to society by the use of cannabis. Cannabis was banned in Mauritius in 1840, Singapore in 1870. Jamaica in 1913.  East Africa Protectorate in 1914, and in Sierra Leone in 1920. In 1922, South Africa banned cannabis, and appealed to the League of Nations to include cannabis among prohibited drugs in its upcoming convention.

In Britain itself, in 1928 in accordance with the 1925 International Opium Convention, the United Kingdom first prohibited cannabis as a drug, adding cannabis as an addendum to the Dangerous Drugs Act 1920.

Cannabis remained a fringe issue in the British public consciousness through the Interwar years and beyond, associated with society’s margins: “coloured seamen of the East End and clubs frequented by Negro theatrical performers”.[21] This perception was strained by a 1950 police raid on Club Eleven in Soho which recovered cannabis and cocaine, and led to the arrest of several young white British men.With the changing youth and drug cultures globally, cannabis arrests increased dramatically in the UK: “from 235 in 1960 to 4,683 by the end of the decade, principally involving white middle class youths with no previous convictions”. By 1973, marijuana possession convictions in the UK had reached 11,111 annually.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.